I had never heard of this book before WORD recommended it to me, but oooooooooh my gosh, do I love it now. I gave it five stars on Goodreads. 
It’s about a young lady named Esther who graduates college and can’t find a job, so she moves back home until she gets it together. Eventually, her parents voluntell her to start babysitting for a family friend, which (like most twentysomethings) she feels uniquely unqualified to do, at least for a little bit. 
Ultimately, I think this book is about Esther learning to see life as it really is, not the fairy-tale she’s imagined it to be. But in a way that isn’t completely depressing? If that makes sense? Like, there’s romance, but not. There’s friendship, but also not really. Esther seems to have found some balance by the end of the book, but the ending doesn’t leave her with any Life Direction. The story here is very much about her figuring out what type of person she wants to be and the kinds of people she wants to have in her life. I don’t have any other words for the book, I just think it’s great. (It’s also suuuper short, I read the whole thing in a couple hours. I would’ve been okay with another two hundred pages.)
WORD | BN | Indiebound

I had never heard of this book before WORD recommended it to me, but oooooooooh my gosh, do I love it now. I gave it five stars on Goodreads. 

It’s about a young lady named Esther who graduates college and can’t find a job, so she moves back home until she gets it together. Eventually, her parents voluntell her to start babysitting for a family friend, which (like most twentysomethings) she feels uniquely unqualified to do, at least for a little bit. 

Ultimately, I think this book is about Esther learning to see life as it really is, not the fairy-tale she’s imagined it to be. But in a way that isn’t completely depressing? If that makes sense? Like, there’s romance, but not. There’s friendship, but also not really. Esther seems to have found some balance by the end of the book, but the ending doesn’t leave her with any Life Direction. The story here is very much about her figuring out what type of person she wants to be and the kinds of people she wants to have in her life. I don’t have any other words for the book, I just think it’s great. (It’s also suuuper short, I read the whole thing in a couple hours. I would’ve been okay with another two hundred pages.)

WORD | BN | Indiebound

7 notes


childhood sounds // fanmix inspired by brown girl dreaming by jacqueline woodson (listen here)

Music is mentioned over and over in brown girl dreaming, so I put together a mix of songs from my own childhood. Which songs do you distinctly remember from when you were little?
Track listing and stories under the cut. 
[[MORE]]
1. I Saw the Sign by Ace of Base | This is the first song I remember hearing. My older cousin had the cassette, and I remember that we listened to it constantly during a vacation in Maine.
2. Fast Car by Tracey Chapman | I remember hearing this in the car a lot, and then it meant something else as I got older, and now it’s sad, but I still love it.
3. Wrapped Up In You by Garth Brooks | My stepdad really loves Garth, and this song is much sweeter than some of his more popular songs. It was either this song or Alan Jackson’s Chattahoochee, okay.
4. I Hope You Dance by Lee Ann Womack | My mom doesn’t like to sing, but she used to sing this song every time it was on the radio. She bought me this cd.
5. Born to Fly by Sara Evans | Last country song, I promise! It’s a fun one!
6. I Will Remember You by Sarah McLachlen | I was obsessed with her and Jewel and Matchbox 20 and that Dawson’s Creek theme song, it’s no wonder I went through an indie singer/songwriter phase for like ten years. 
7. Unpretty by TLC | I also loved all kinds of 90’s pop, all of it, I loved it ALL. But I felt like this was a good one to add to the mix. It was almost Destiny Child’s Say My Name. My stepdad once told me that I should never date a boy who refuses to say my name, it took me a while to understand what that meant.
8. Wannabe by the Spice Girls | Obviously. I mean. I was born in 1990. So. This is required reading.

childhood sounds // fanmix inspired by brown girl dreaming by jacqueline woodson (listen here)

Music is mentioned over and over in brown girl dreaming, so I put together a mix of songs from my own childhood. Which songs do you distinctly remember from when you were little?

Track listing and stories under the cut. 

Read More

"The Reader" by Jacqueline Woodson. (BROWN GIRL DREAMING, page 61)

reblogbookclub:

I loved this part. It made me think so much about the conversations that shaped my life just before and after I arrived.
Here’s what I know:- I am Rachel Lea after my late great-grandmothers Regina and Lillian.- I was almost Rebecca Lily.- If I were a boy I would have been Randy.- My father wanted boy-me to be Rhys, but my mother really did not.Do you know whom you’re named after or what else your name might have been?
-RF

My middle name is Elizabeth, after my maternal grandmother Libby. My paternal grandmother was obsessed with British royalty, so my parents told her it was after Queen Elizabeth. Honestly, I think she believed them, at least a little bit.

reblogbookclub:

I loved this part. It made me think so much about the conversations that shaped my life just before and after I arrived.

Here’s what I know:
- I am Rachel Lea after my late great-grandmothers Regina and Lillian.
- I was almost Rebecca Lily.
- If I were a boy I would have been Randy.
- My father wanted boy-me to be Rhys, but my mother really did not.

Do you know whom you’re named after or what else your name might have been?

-RF

My middle name is Elizabeth, after my maternal grandmother Libby. My paternal grandmother was obsessed with British royalty, so my parents told her it was after Queen Elizabeth. Honestly, I think she believed them, at least a little bit.

"Rivers" by Jacqueline Woodson (BROWN GIRL DREAMING, pages 38-39)


my family tree! lots of people!

my family tree! lots of people!

Leila is the main character, but most of the book is told from the perspective of people she meets on a cross-country roadtrip. Loooove this narrative device.

I think first section of the book gives only a surface perspective of the protagonist (as most books do), so if you’re not sure whether or not to continue, keep going. I would guess that most readers find her unsympathetic until they get further into the book, but maybe they won’t like her at all. If you’re the type of reader who is off-put but unlikable characters, this is not the book for you. It forces the reader to look at why a character acts impulsively.

BN / Indiebound

Visiting Day

reblogbookclub:

by

While we’re still in the “generic thoughts” week, I wanted to co-opt the discussion for a minute to talk about another one of Jacqueline Woodson’s other books: Visiting Day.

As a librarian, no single book has had as much impact on my professional life as Visiting Day. A picture book written by Jacqueline Woodson and illustrated by James Ransome, Visiting Day is about a young girl making the journey with her grandmother to visit her incarcerated father.

When I first came across the book in grad school my initial, knee jerk reaction was “Jesus, this is hella depressing and I hope I’m never in a situation where this is appropriate.” Smash cut to my first job where I had a lot of kids who would say “My dad stays in Maryland” when pressed. Some of the dads definitely did just live in Maryland. We were nearby, after all, and rent was better there. But then there were the kids who would never elaborate past “Maryland” and would change the subject as quickly as possible. Visiting Day became a way to talk to the youngest children about what they were going through, and to sometimes bring their older siblings into the conversation. Anytime we made collages to send in care packages, I’d bring out Visiting Day and just have it laying around. Ready, for when it would be appropriate.

I haven’t read far enough into Brown Girl Dreaming yet to see if it includes passages about the uncle who inspired Visiting Day, but I’m certainly hoping and looking forward to learning more about Robert Irby.

If you have a few extra dollars or just a thirst for more information, here’s the link to a non-profit in DC that helps send kids to summer camp in Maryland (“Maryland,” Maryland) every year. The kids do normal camp stuff like camp fire and s’mores at night, but they get to spend the days at the prison with their fathers who they rarely, if ever, get a chance to see during the rest of the year.

reblogbookclub:

youngadultescent:

Since this is the first free verse book we’re reading, how do you read poetry? Do you read line by line? Do you read until you get to punctuation? A little bit of both?

Some responses from Rebloggers:

nikstephney 

I read line by line for the most part. Sometimes I read until punctuation if the flow of the poem calls for it.

renegadeelena:

Punctuation. Then I take in the beauty of the words and how they’re phrased before moving onto the next.

zinccadmium:

I cannot read verse.  I read very fast and my normal scan pattern just… kind of shorts out and I stop absorbing words and start just looking at pages.  Anything longer than 4-8 lines is completely out of the question.  (You can do a little research about scan patterns and how they relate to the speed at which you read.)

 

Aaaand, since I never answered, I do both. I’ll read until I get to punctuation so that I understand what a section is trying to say. Then I’ll go back and re-read to get a feeling for how that section is supposed to sound. 

staff:

By the way: If you’re interested, Tumblr has filed some wonky comments on net neutrality with the FCC, setting out our suggestions for how they can get this right. Have a read.

If you missed our video about how you can help, it’s right here.

And if you haven’t made your voice heard already, you can do so now.  

Did you know that you’re in this, katiecoyle?! Top of page five!

4,449 notes